Who Is Harry Blackstone Jr.? - Master Magicians: Monday, June 1, 2015

Who Is Harry Blackstone Jr.? - Master Magicians: Monday, June 1, 2015

harry blackstone jr

The ability to perform magic could be an innate talent inherited from predecessors. An example of this is Harry Blackstone Jr., one of the most well-known magicians in America. He is the exceptionally gifted son of Harry Blackstone Sr., known as ‘The Great Blackstone of America.’ He is known as a writer, an actor, an inventor, a casino showroom headliner, a TV personality, a comedian, an entertainer, a teacher, a father and above all, he is the creator and performer of the largest magic and illusion show ever to play on Broadway.

Harry Blackstone, Jr. was born in Colon, Michigan, “The Magic Capitol of the World,” which incidentally was the kingdom for his father during his reign as the most famous magician of his time. It is in this city where Blackstone Jr. first performed in a magical play at age six. However, some reviews revealed that his father included him in his magic shows as early as infancy. In his early performances, he appeared and disappeared through his father’s illusions. It is also through his father’s magic that he mastered and internalized the tricks of this craft.

Although he was honed through the supervision of his father, Harry Blackstone Jr. tried to develop a more modern approach in the field of magic. As he put it, “What I am undertaking is the challenging but delightful task of bringing this magnificent art to even higher levels, building on what has gone before, injecting a modern, innovative presentation that is very much of the present, of the future, and of my own creation.” In some occasions, he would perform a sequence of his father’s illusions, but he is better known for performing the world-famous magic tricks titled the “Dancing Handkerchief” illusion, the Floating Lightbulb, the Vanishing Birdcage, and the Frightening Buzzsaw.

Harry Blackstone Jr Floating Lightbulb Video


His efforts to modernize his father’s magical tricks bore fruit as he was able to gain respect and honor from not only his audience but from his peers. He also collected several impressive titles in his profession, including “Magician of the Year” in 1979 and 1985 by the Academy of Magical Arts; and “International Ambassador of Magic,” by the Society of American Magicians.

He co-authored a book with Charles Reynolds and Regina Reynolds entitled “The Blackstone Book of Magic and Illusion.” Some of the illusions discussed in the book are still applied by magicians today.

He died on May 14, 1997 at age 62 due to complications from battling pancreatic cancer. After his death, some of his performance equipment and props were auctioned to collectors and magicians from around the world.

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